#348 Freshen Up!
Tell a friend

I never drink water. I'm afraid it will become habit-forming.

W. C. Fields

Back to top.

7 Great Ways to Freshen Up Your Water

By Denis Faye

Thirsty? You should be. If you're reading this, it probably means you're working your tush off every day with Slim in 6®, P90X®, ChaLEAN Extreme®, or another fine Beachbody® program. And when you do that, you perspire. And when you perspire, you need to replenish the water in your system.

Sadly, you may be one of those lost souls who can't stand the taste of water. Sure, you could hydrate with juice or sports drinks, but then you'd be adding a bunch of sugar or artificial sweeteners into the mix. Yes, these drinks can play a role in a healthy diet, but 8 glasses a day of orange juice would be far more vitamin C than you need, as well as hundreds of sugar calories that you shouldn't be consuming—calories completely unchecked by the fiber you get from eating actual oranges.

Cold Mountain River

Actually, water is the way to go, so to help you get the stuff down, we've come up with a few simple tips. But before we get started, we'd like to make a preemptive response to all of you who will write in to "inform" us about that widely touted 2002 study in the American Journal of Physiology that discounts the old 8-ounce-glass-of-water, eight-times-a-day rule. According to the study, a normal, healthy adult just needs to drink when he or she is thirsty to stay hydrated.

Well, before you hang up your squirt bottle, keep in mind that the study includes a huge disclaimer: the light-and-easy hydration rule doesn't apply to people with medical conditions requiring fluid control, athletes, people living in extreme conditions, and people involved in prolonged physical activity. The way I see it, if you're doing P90X, that's going to put you in at least one of those groups, if not two or three.

In other words, here are seven ways to make water more palatable. Use 'em.

  1. Water with LemonGet fruity. A squish of lemon, lime, or orange goes a long way toward giving water a little zing. It's almost calorie free, and you get a bonus blast of vitamin C. Furthermore, if you happen to be doing our programs while you're out at sea, it can help with any unwanted scurvy.

  2. Herbify yourself. Make yourself a big tub of caffeine-free, herbal tea, or "tisane," as the French call it. Technically, it isn't made from the Camellia sinensis (aka "tea") plant, which means it doesn't have the antioxidants of tea, but it tastes good and has no negative effects. There are hundreds of flavors to choose from. Mint and raspberry are a couple of our favorites.

  3. Bubble up! According to a 2001 study out of the Creighton University Osteoporosis Research Center in Nebraska, the notion that carbonated water leaches calcium from your bones is completely untrue. So, if you want to hydrate with a big glass of Perrier, go for it.

  4. Water with Mint and LimeMinty fresh. Crushed mint is another great way to liven up your water. If you want to get the most out of the leaves, put them in the glass first and grind them down. This will release a ton of flavor. Mint is also known to soothe upset stomachs and, more importantly, freshen your breath. Mix the mint with the lemon for a real taste sensation!

  5. Filter flavor. It's a subtle shift, but sometimes the filtration process can alter the taste of tap water. Get yourself a Brita filter or similar brand and give it a go. Even if the flavor doesn't change, you'll be drinking purer stuff.

  6. Brush your teeth. A good scrub of your teeth and tongue overpowers the taste of almost everything you put in your mouth for several minutes afterward. Take this opportunity to knock back a glass of H2O. You won't taste a thing.

  7. Cuke you. This one is a little wacky, but if you like new tastes, give it a shot. Chop up a cucumber (yes, a cucumber). Add it to a pitcher of water and chill it for 2 to 3 hours so that the cucumber flavor can permeate. Serve the water with ice. It's the perfect refreshing drink for a hot, summer day.

Related Articles
"Tips to Stay Cool: Avoiding Heat Exhaustion"
"Is Beer the Healthiest Alcohol?"
"Should You Drink Bottled Water?"

Got something to say? Chat with the writers and other readers this coming Monday, March 23rd, at 7:00 PM ET, 4:00 PM PT, in the Beachbody Chatroom!


If you'd like to ask a question or comment on this newsletter article, click here to add a comment in the newsletter review section or you can email us at mailbag@beachbody.com.

Back to top.


Featured from the Beachbody Store
Shake It with Shaun T!

Shaun T and Tania Ante have the moves to help you shake off the pounds!
Rockin' Body®
Rockin' Body®
Get your heart pumping with Shaun T's high-octane dance party that will have you sweating off the pounds to all your favorite dance-floor hits! Plus get 4 FREE gifts to keep!
Learn More
Shaun T's Dance Party Series™
Shaun T's Dance Party Series
Shaun T brings all the hottest dance-floor moves to your living room. If you're ready to learn exclusive moves only available to Shaun's celebrity clients, these Dance Party workouts are made for you! Plus get a BONUS 5-minute Ab Blaster workout!
Learn More
Hip Hop Abs® Ultimate Results
Hip Hop Abs® Ultimate Results
Shed the pounds and get tight, sexy abs with Shaun T's fun, advanced workouts! Plus get 3 FREE gifts—Weighted Gloves, bonus dance routine, and advanced workout calendar!
Learn More
Consult your physician before beginning any exercise program.
Beachbody Store

Back to top.


Nutrition 911, Part VI: Sweeteners
(Plus, 5 Ways to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth!)

By Steve Edwards

Welcome to part VI of our very, very basic nutrition class. We've now taken a basic look at what we should eat, marketing slogans to be wary of, and how to read food labels. Today we'll look at sugar and fake sugar, and then try to come up with a reasonable strategy to deal with our sweet teeth.

Sugar

Remember, this class is the ultra basics, so instead of using words like saccharide and galactose, let's just say that sugar is the simplest form of carbohydrates. It's sweet, yummy, and easy to crave. In nature, it's found in plants. As you recall from Part I, plants have fiber, and this minimizes sugar's impact on your system by causing it to be digested slowly. Carbohydrates, whether from potatoes, lentils, or bananas, all break down into sugars in your body, and you use these sugars as fuel when you do stuff. So, if done right, eating carbohydrates is a good thing, especially when you're active.

Potato, Bananas, and Lentils

Refined sugar, the white grainy stuff you'll find in gummy bears, chocolate, Coke, and most desserts, is sugar minus the fiber that surrounds it in nature. What you're left with is a sweet but highly caloric food that your body absorbs very rapidly, causing a "sugar rush." This "rush" is a temporary imbalance in your system that your body tries to regulate—a spike of energy followed by a lull.

But your body hates the lull, so to bring you back up, it'll crave, you guessed it, more sugar. It's an ugly cycle, considering refined sugar's only nutritional value is similar to a nitrous injection in a race car—a quick burst of energy that burns right out. This might be a good thing if you're in a drag race (or, in human terms, if you need an extra burst of energy during a workout), but it's a bad thing any other time because, if you don't put that excess sugar to use, it gets stored as fat.

Bottom line: Refined sugar is okay for sports performance (while you are skiing, bicycling, running, and so on), but it's bad at all other times. Unfortunately, we tend to want it at all other times. Therefore, straight sugar consumption should be limited.

Marathon RunnerNow you're probably wondering, "So the best time to eat gummy bears would be during a marathon instead of at night in front of the TV?" The answer is yes, absolutely.

And now you're probably thinking, "But I want dessert after dinner!" Right, we all do. Something sweet after a meal is pretty darn ingrained in our society.

Artificial Sweeteners

I'm not going to do a breakdown of the artificial sweeteners on the market—because we already have. I recommend that you read "Sweet Nothing," issue #295 (refer to the Related Articles section below), which will only take you a couple of minutes. Essentially, there are a bunch of different artificial sweeteners to choose from. Most are made of various chemical reactions that your taste buds think are sweet but aren't used by your body and have zero calories.

There are also some, called sugar alcohols, which have fewer calories than regular sugar because they've been combined with an artificial fiber that you can't digest. These have "-tol" at the end of their names, like "xylitol."

Stevia PlantOne, Stevia, or "sweet leaf," is natural. It's basically a, well, sweet leaf that you can chew on or that we can grind into a powder, like sugar. Now you might be thinking, "This all sounds great! What's the catch?"

The catch is that a lot of recent science is showing us that calories might not be the only reason we're fat. In fact, a handful of studies cited in "Sweet Nothing" concluded that those using artificial sweetener regularly tended to be more obese than those who used regular sugar.

Then there's the little fact that sweeteners may not be safe. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved some, but given their track record (Vioxx, etc.), we can easily—and should—be a bit skeptical. With a cursory search of the Internet, you can find both pro and con studies for each alternative sweetener. The FDA is highly influenced by lobbyists and does not accept all viable studies, meaning that you might want more than FDA approval before blindly trusting what you put into your body.

So let's use some logic to try to assess how best to choose a sweetener. By adding two and two together, we should be able stack the odds in our favor.

  • Time. Saccharin is the most maligned of this bunch, yet it's been around for more than 100 years and is still on the market. Sure, there is some negative research out there, but it can't be that bad! A lot of people consume a lot of different artificial sweeteners. If people were dropping like flies, we'd probably hear about it. In fact, sweet leaf has been used for thousands of years. FDA approval or not, that's what I call time-tested.

  • Research. If one of these sweeteners were so good, why would other people keep trying to come up with better ones? From this fact alone, we know that at least some of those negative findings must have an inkling of merit.

  • MoneyMoney. The influence of big business can keep need-to-know information from the public (again, Vioxx, etc.). Most sweeteners have become American staples, such as aspartame in diet soda.

  • Artificial or natural? "Artificial" sounds bad and "natural" sounds good. But just because something is natural does not mean it's good. Tobacco and opium are natural. So, the claim that Stevia is good because "it's natural" bears little relevance. Many very beneficial drugs are artificial. However, you generally don't want to take them habitually, which is how some people use artificial sweeteners. Artificial doesn't mean bad, but it should mean caution.

  • Anecdotal. I'm going to share two quick stories:

    First, my sister is a sweet leaf proponent. It's time-honored and natural but lacks FDA approval. She lobbied Starbucks for a natural alternative to Splenda (chlorinated sugar). She got a long line of positive responses up the chain of command until, finally, they stopped returning her calls. A short time later, her local market (a chain that she used as an example for Starbucks) was forced to stop offering sweet leaf with their coffee and only sell it as a "supplement." Coincidence or a blatant case of big business (Starbucks and/or the folks who bring you Splenda) using strong-arm tactics against someone who truly cares about your health? In the wake of the FDA scandal, it's hard not to at least harbor a little suspicion.

    Next is a female athlete whom I trained; she could not lose weight, despite being in great shape and eating a strict diet. Her vice was about 100 ounces of no-cal soft drinks per day. She would eye double Big Gulps like a junky does crack. When we were able to get her off the stuff—she even drank some sugared soft drinks to do so—she lost 15 pounds. This example is now being echoed with science. Two large-scale studies spanning many years have shown a link between artificial sweeteners and obesity.

Bottom line: There is no hard evidence that any one sweetener is better than the others. Most likely the stuff won't kill you, at least not quickly. But given that we also know it's not 100 percent safe, it would seem wise to limit your consumption as much as possible.

So now that we understand that sugar should be limited, let's look at some ways to do it.

5 Ways to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

So what's a dessert-loving health seeker to do? Here are my five favorite ways to cut your sugar consumption without ruining all of your fun:

  1. Small Bowl of Ice CreamPortion control. I recently saw a sign in a Denny's window saying, "Remember, an apple a day." The sign was of an apple surrounded by about 2,000 calories of sugar and fat. Our society has gone crazy for "bigger is better." After dinner, your body is not hungry. You don't need 2,000 extra calories. You don't need 200! If you savor a square of chocolate or a tablespoon of Ben & Jerry's slowly, it will curb your cravings without a noticeable effect on your diet.

  2. Don't snack on artificial sweeteners. Gum is probably the worst snack because it creates a stimulus-response action that causes you to crave sweet stuff constantly.

  3. Add some fruit to your sugar or artificial sweetener. Fruit is both sweet and good for you. However, I realize an apple might not be enough all by itself to satiate your sweet tooth. But you can dress up fruit with a very small amount of a "real" dessert and make it pretty darn decadent.

  4. Make sure you have some complex carbs in your diet. This sounds boring, but complex carbs, like whole grains, sweet potatoes, rice, beans, 'n' stuff, all slowly break down into blood sugar. If your blood sugar is steady, you won't crave sugar. You might still habitually crave it, but that's a ton better than a sugar-crash craving, which will likely lead to bingeing.

  5. Whey Protein PowderThe protein powder trick. Most protein powders have a small amount of sugar and a touch of artificial sweetener, and are 90 percent protein. If you can find one you like (our Whey Protein Powder is fantastic, ahem, ahem), you might be able to curb your cravings with a high-protein snack. Chalene Johnson, the creator of Turbo Jam®, uses chocolate protein powder as a base for pudding, and Beachbody® advice staff member, Denis Faye, sprinkles it on cereal. If you get creative, the possibilities may be endless.

But wait, there's more! Not today, but next time, we're going to let your two dietary bad guys do battle. Joining me will be the late Howard Cosell for the Thiller in Vanilla!

Related Articles
"Sweet Nothing"
"Nutrition 911, Part V: 5 Quick Steps to Mastering Food Labels"
"Nutrition 911, Part IV: What 'Fat Free' and 'Low Carb' Really Mean"
"Nutrition 911, Part III: Deciphering Marketing Jargon"
"Nutrition 911, Part II: What to Eat"
"Nutrition 911"

Got something to say? Chat with the writers and other readers this coming Monday, March 23rd, at 7:00 PM ET, 4:00 PM PT, in the Beachbody Chatroom!


Steve EdwardsIf you'd like to ask a question or comment on this newsletter article, click here to add a comment in the newsletter review section or you can email us at mailbag@beachbody.com.

Check out our Fitness Advisor's responses to your comments in Steve Edwards' Mailbag on the Message Boards. If you'd like to receive Steve Edwards' Mailbag by email, click here to subscribe to Steve's Health and Fitness Newsletter. And if you'd like to know more about Steve's views on fitness, nutrition, and outdoor sports, read his blog, The Straight Dope.


Back to top.


Test Your Sweetener IQ!

By Joe Wilkes

True or False?

  1. SweetenersFalse: Of Equal, Splenda, and Sweet'N Low, Equal is the sweetest. Splenda (sucralose) is 600 times sweeter than sugar. Sweet'N Low (saccharin) is 300 to 500 times sweeter, and Equal (aspartame) trails the pack at 200 times sweeter.

  2. True: Aspartame turns into formaldehyde in your body. Aspartame breaks down into phenylalanine (which can affect people with phenylketonuria), aspartate, and methanol. Methanol is then broken down further by the liver into formaldehyde and formic acid, both toxic. Fortunately, the toxic effects of methanol and its byproducts are caused by prolonged exposure, and the belief is that the amount of methanol exposure and the length of time that it's in the body make aspartame reasonably harmless in small doses. However, some warn that a cumulative effect of aspartame consumption may exist, which could cause long-term health problems.

  3. False: Saccharin causes cancer. In the 1970s, studies showed that saccharin caused bladder cancer in lab rats. This led to a warning on all products containing saccharin that the product may cause cancer. Subsequent studies showed that the cancer was caused by biological mechanisms present only in rats, and that no evidence existed that saccharin caused cancer in humans. In 2000, the federal government delisted it as a carcinogen, and products containing saccharin no longer carry the warning.

  4. True: Sucralose is made from sugar. It's essentially true. It begins as a sugar molecule with its hydrogen-oxygen atom groups replaced with chlorine, which turns it into something else entirely. It's like saying glass is made from sand. It's true, but you probably wouldn't let your kid play in a box full of glass. The makers of Equal, an aspartame product, sued Splenda over its tagline "Made from sugar, so it tastes like sugar," claiming that it was false advertising. The case was eventually settled outside of court, with undisclosed settlement conditions.

  5. SteviaFalse: Stevia is banned in the U.S. Stevia was banned in 1991 from being imported to the U.S. The ban was revoked in 1995 after the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act was enacted. No reason has ever been given for why stevia was banned. Many suspect it was due to political pressure from the artificial sweetener industry. A plant-based sweetener, stevia is currently only available as a supplement, and not recognized as a food additive by the Food and Drug Administration, as it has not been proven to be safe. It hasn't been proven to be unsafe, however, and has been used as a sweetener and additive in other countries such as Japan for years, with no harmful effects reported.



If you'd like to ask a question or comment on this newsletter article, click here to add a comment in the newsletter review section or you can email us at mailbag@beachbody.com.

Back to top.


 

Print this page
Reviews
Total number of Reviews: 10
Submit a review  

"Okay about sweetners. This is crazy but very true. Ive been a Cosmetologist for 18 years now and strangely enough found that people with sensitive scalps that break out to color, I just add equal yes the sweetner to their color and it completely neutralizes whatever it is irratating the scalp. Thats when I decided to no longer drink artificial sweetner if it had that much stuff in it to change something as strong as color. Crazy but True."

– Jennifer Iturriaga, NV

"Those are fantastic ideas to make water taste better. One thing that is better about straight water though is that it doesn't trigger any digestive processes. Once you put things in water to add flavor it triggers the release of digestive acids and leads to an overactive and or exhausted digestive system if done all of the time."

– CD Dowell, newburyport, MA

"Best write up I've seen on the subject. As a student of nutrition I think your article was the most balanced picture of both sides of the issue. Kudos"

– Katherine Grzesiak, New Lenox, IL

"Altering the temperature also helps. Go from cold to hot,.. the colder the water the more your body works to warm it up, so you are burning calories warming up the water as well."

– Kimmy

"Just a shout out to you Beachbody writers for the consistently well written articles - informative and fun to read. Thank you. You are impressive."

– Southampton, NY

"I have a question. I seem to be addicted to Pepsi. Other drinkers of Pepsi have the same problem. Weve all tried switching to something else and go right back to Pepsi. Its not the caffeine Im addicted to because the other sodas have it too. Ive tried diet sodas as well and just cold turkey not drinking any soda. My craving for just Pepsi is overwhelming. Can you give me and others any advice as to how to stop drinking it. I sure would appreciate the help."

– Dianna Campbell, Cypress, CA

"For years I have been trying to give up diet soda with no luck. I was drinking between 60-100 oz. a day. Reading about how aspertame turns to fermaldahide in the body made it so easy to quit. I have had no desire to take another drink since then, it has now been 3 weeks. Thank you so much for all your helpful information. I look forward to reading and learning more."

– Jennifer Tomaszewski, Fenton, MI

"Great articles. I am a huge fan of cutting out all the sodas and other flavored drinks. Just drink good clean water. Another excellent ingredient to add to your water is a tablespoon of organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is refreshing and is great for keeping your digestive system working well. Thanks again."

– Micah, Puyallup, WA

"My goodness, I replaced artificial sweeteners in just about all my food and beverages. As scared as I am of the dead, and funeral homes, I will never open another package in my life. In fact, I am on my way to the garage with my old box now. Thank God I was not addicted to this."

– Mia Jordan, San Francisco, CA

"I keep a big glass pitcher in the fridge filled with water, ice, and slices of cucumber and lemon. The combination of citrus and herbal flavors is really refreshing, but subtle."

– Ann Merry, Rochester, MI

Previous Next

Beachbody Survey

Click here to compare Beachbody fitness programs
eGift Cards are here!—Beachbody®—Order Now
P90X2™
ChaLEAN Extreme®
Kathy Smith's Project:YOU! Type 2™
Debbie Siebers' Slim in 6®
INSANITY®
Brazil Butt Lift®—AVAILABLE NOW!
Now Available—TurboFire®—Intense Cardio Conditioning—Learn More

Follow Beachbody Online

Connect with Beachbody, fans, coaches, and your favorite trainers!

Social Media
Beachbody
Beachbody
Blogs
Carl Daikeler
Beauty By Beachbody
Steve Edwards
Tony Horton
Chalene Johnson
Message Boards
Beachbody Message Boards
RSS Feeds (What is RSS?)
Beachbody Blog
P90X Extreme Newsletter

Share This Page

Bookmark or share this page by emailing it to your friends, or adding it to your favorite networking sites! Simply mouse over the Share icon below for options.

Bookmark and Share